Interior welds

Have problems with your car? Have questions about the inner workings of your car and/or would like to know theories and technical aspects of how things work, ask away here!

Moderators: Nismo, 13th-Angel, Axlerod

Interior welds

Postby nismo5 on Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:25 pm

Since I'm going to be patching up a few holes in the interior and re-weld a few of the slightly rusted seams, are there any suggested areas that I could weld in order to increase the rigidity of the car?

Thanks
-Eric
nismo5
Casual Driver
 
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 10:36 pm

Re: Interior welds

Postby Nismo on Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:12 am

Every spot that has that yellow seam filler in it.
"Don't put the power on, till you know you never have to take it off" -- Sir Jackie Stewart
Image
User avatar
Nismo
NEO240SX Co-founder
 
Posts: 15644
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2001 6:01 am

Re: Interior welds

Postby nismo5 on Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:22 am

Alright thanks. I've been having some trouble removing the old seam sealer though. I've removed most of the sound deadening with a heat gun and putty knife but when I get to the seams it doesn't come off as well. I used a wire wheel as well on those areas but it's still kind of stuck on. Another type of wire wheel might work better. Any other suggestions?
nismo5
Casual Driver
 
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 10:36 pm

Re: Interior welds

Postby bartyb on Tue Jul 01, 2008 3:35 am

Oh yeah, that sound deadening is a bitch, specially near the transmission tunnel. I did it during the winter on a specially cold day since it's my daily driver, so the cold helped. Try acetone, it will disolve the remaining bits of the sound deadening. I tried many chemicals until acetone did the trick. As for the welding, you can even go fancy and seam weld the whole car. What I would suggest, from personal experience, my first s13 actually sheared at the seam in the wheel wells (where the frame meets the shock towers sheet metal in the wheel well. Weld that up as well as the shock towers. You can even make your own Nismo brace and weld a bar in between to make the car stiffer. I also partially seam welded the interior of my car, just remove as much of that goo before. And make sure your rear frame rails are good, I had to weld both sides on my car, and I did feel a difference afterwards.
Image
User avatar
bartyb
NEO Hardcore Crew
 
Posts: 2317
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2003 3:22 am
Location: Gatineau

Re: Interior welds

Postby Drift_240 on Thu Jul 03, 2008 12:40 am

it depends how much effort you are willing to put into it, decide how long you want your car for before you invest the time.

that being said there is lots of good places to look at:

interior:
-under the rear floor mount of the drivers and passenger seats
-the inside of the rocker panels near the front of the doors, especially the drivers side
-drivers side floor/transmission tunnel area
-Front Frame rails
-Rear Frame (replace your subframe if it needs it aswell)
-Front strut towers
-the trunk on the drivers side,

... other cosmetic stuff: body panels etc.
Image
Drift_240
Casual Driver
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:40 am

Re: Interior welds

Postby MRWmotorsports on Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:48 pm

Removing seam sealer: Liquid Nitrogen is the only way to go. Spray it on, freeze the sealer, and give it a couple of taps with a chipping hammer and it literally falls off...

The only problems are:
- getting a supply of Liquid Nitrogen... comes from industrial gas suppliers; you have to rent the "dewer"; it's expensive; it evapourates quickly; they might not even supply it to you if you don't have an account.
- applying it... you need a flex hose from your dewer, long enough to reach, and some kind of valve with a wand for applying

If you do get ahold of this stuff, be extremely careful as it deadly cold...

-Martin.
MRWmotorsports
NEO Hardcore Crew
 
Posts: 3075
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 8:54 pm

Re: Interior welds

Postby Nismo on Thu Jul 03, 2008 6:06 pm

MRWmotorsports wrote:Removing seam sealer: Liquid Nitrogen is the only way to go. Spray it on, freeze the sealer, and give it a couple of taps with a chipping hammer and it literally falls off...

The only problems are:
- getting a supply of Liquid Nitrogen... comes from industrial gas suppliers; you have to rent the "dewer"; it's expensive; it evapourates quickly; they might not even supply it to you if you don't have an account.
- applying it... you need a flex hose from your dewer, long enough to reach, and some kind of valve with a wand for applying

If you do get ahold of this stuff, be extremely careful as it deadly cold...

-Martin.


The way the guys do it on Fresh Alloy is to buy a few blocks of dry ice... (they will sell it to any joe blow, no questions asked) and break it down into small pieces and spread them all over the seam filler. Takes longer that liquid nitrogen, but it still works.
"Don't put the power on, till you know you never have to take it off" -- Sir Jackie Stewart
Image
User avatar
Nismo
NEO240SX Co-founder
 
Posts: 15644
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2001 6:01 am


Return to Technical Questions


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


cron